writings blog

Interview: Fadi Boukaram

For “America in a Trance” I am investigating and respond as I travel through towns and cities across the state of Pennsylvania, a once prosperous and vibrant region, where the notion of small town values and sustainable small businesses thrived under the sheltering wings of American Industry. 

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by Yoav Friedlander

Interview: Patrick Joust

"For most of my life I didn’t take pictures beyond the standard snapshots everyone takes. Once I did get into photography, shortly after college, it was a completely solo undertaking. One of the things that appealed to me about it was that I could do it alone. That’s still a big part of it."

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Interview with Harris Mizrahi

At some point shortly after I finished high school I started getting into classic country music and listened to Marty Robbins almost obsessively. The songs are short stories about the west and the imagery so successfully stuck with me and fascinated me. It became its own grand mythology. While I was in photo school I was also assisting some photographers on days that I didn't have class. One photographer I was working with liked my photography and my interest in country music and offered to have me come with him on a personal shooting trip through west Texas. I was there as a fellow photographer not an assistant.

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by Niko J Kallianiotis

Interview: Yoav Friedlander

"This is an essential question to ask because the transition from Israel, the Holy Land, to Queens not only influenced my work, it redefined it. There are two parts to my background, one that I had control over and the one which I was born into.

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by Niko J Kallianiotis

Interview: Andrew Steiner

"The attraction of working with familiar places - for example, the Chicago train lines and my neighborhood of Uptown - is that they are part of my day to day life. I think all artists are going to make their most authentic work about what they know. My own experiences allow me to develop narratives that somewhat reflect ideas and thoughts I have about the world around me but are also open to the stories of the subjects I choose.

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Interview: Amanda Tinker

Because I teach the history of photography, from the early conception to contemporary practice, the places I draw inspiration from run the gamut and may explain why the work seems to reference both the historical and the contemporary at once. I do more than just acknowledge historical practices and ideas. I revel in them.

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by Niko J Kallianiotis

Interview: Dimitri Mellos

"I believe that my status as a transplant in New York has fostered my photographic work, also, not least, because photography has been a way for me to appropriate my adopted home and truly make it my own. It’s ironic that I probably know the streets of New York better than most native New Yorkers, thanks to my photographic peregrinations.

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Interview: Jennifer McClure

"I only recently realized that there is a consistent theme in my work. I don’t set out to make similar types of stories. I start a project because I have something that nags at my brain and my heart, a question that keeps me up at night. Apparently, I think a lot about how we connect as human beings--about what it means to be alone and what it takes to be with someone else."

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From Wall to Main / Niko J. Kallianiotis

In November of 1935 Walker Evans made a photograph about Bethlehem titled “A Graveyard and Steel Mill in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania”. A large cement cross sits in the foreground overlooking a perfectly composed scene of American life and industry. A cemetery competes with brick homes and porches that are knitted together in a plateau, fluctuating between past and present. 

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by Niko J Kallianiotis

Interview: Mike Froio

When I started the project From the Mainline, I was looking for something that connected a number of different personal interests, something big that I could dive into in phases and that would provide a sort of long-term return creatively. The railroad is what initially led me to pick up a camera, I wanted to get back to the subject but not in the sense of the trains themselves, I instead wanted to focus on the surviving infrastructure and landscape.

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A Form of Confession / Niko J. Kallianiotis

Photography is the most powerful mode of communication, and on a daily basis we are bombarded with visuals through social media platforms: news organizations, Instagram, blogs… the list goes on. Reviewing and translating a photograph is a highly subjective encounter but sometimes, and in my opinion not in the desired frequency, the response is automatic; one that peers through the heart, a moment that puts you inside the skin, heart and soul of the photographer.

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by Niko J Kallianiotis